Vigne Surrau “Branu” Vermentino 2022

SKU: ITSASURWIWH175022 Category:
Vermentino | Sardegna | Italy | White Wine | Vigne Surrau | 2022 | 0,75 L | 14 %
About
Vigne Surrau "Branu" Vermentino 2022 is a dry white wine, made exclusively from Vermentino grapes, sourced from the coastal vineyards of Sardinia, Italy. This wine embodies the unique characteristics of the Sardinian terroir, with Vigne Surrau's commitment to sustainable viticulture and modern winemaking techniques ensuring a vibrant and expressive wine. The 2022 vintage is celebrated for its freshness, aromatic intensity, and the clear expression of the Vermentino varietal.
Producer
Vigne Surrau is a young winery in Gallura (Sardinia) with centuries of tradition. The two main values ​​on which her philosophy is based are tradition and innovation. Tradition drives the selection of grape varieties to grow, and innovation enables the latest technology and experimental techniques to create wines, such as drying Vermentino and Cannonau grapes and further producing sparkling wines using the Champagne method. In its image, the company follows simple principles: a very modern minimalist logo and labels on the bottles symbolize a strong connection with the Gallura region. This logo was inspired by the San Pantaleo Mountains, an integral part of the landscape of the Arzachena region. The Surrau Winery is located in a place where art meets nature. The building has transparent facades and walls built of local stone, making the winery an organic part of the surrounding landscape, which surrounds 40 hectares of land on which the grapes for the Surrau wines are grown. The soil of the Gallura region imparts a distinct minerality to Sardinian wines.
Tasting notes

Tasting notes for Vigne Surrau “Branu” Vermentino 2022 reveal a bright bouquet of citrus fruits, such as lemon and grapefruit, intertwined with floral hints of white blossoms and a subtle note of Mediterranean herbs. On the palate, it offers a crisp acidity and a medium-bodied texture, with flavors of green apple, pear, and a touch of salinity, leading to a refreshing and lingering finish. This Vermentino is noted for its balance, lively character, and the clean, mineral-driven profile typical of Sardinian wines.

Pairing

Vigne Surrau “Branu” Vermentino 2022 pairs beautifully with seafood dishes like grilled octopus, shrimp scampi, or ceviche, where its acidity and freshness enhance the delicate flavors of the seafood. It also complements light salads, goat cheese, and Mediterranean cuisine, providing a refreshing contrast and elevating the overall dining experience with its vibrant and crisp character.

16 in stock

23.00 

Vigne Surrau is a young winery in Gallura (Sardinia) with centuries of tradition. The two main values ​​on which her philosophy is based are tradition and innovation. Tradition drives the selection of grape varieties to grow, and innovation enables the latest technology and experimental techniques to create wines, such as drying Vermentino and Cannonau grapes and further producing sparkling wines using the Champagne method. In its image, the company follows simple principles: a very modern minimalist logo and labels on the bottles symbolize a strong connection with the Gallura region. This logo was inspired by the San Pantaleo Mountains, an integral part of the landscape of the Arzachena region. The Surrau Winery is located in a place where art meets nature. The building has transparent facades and walls built of local stone, making the winery an organic part of the surrounding landscape, which surrounds 40 hectares of land on which the grapes for the Surrau wines are grown. The soil of the Gallura region imparts a distinct minerality to Sardinian wines.
Vermentino is a white-wine grape with crispy acidity and inviting flavors of stone fruits, grapefruit peel, herbs and a hint of saline minerality. Depending on the production methods, it can be quite neutral or aromatic and complex.
Sardinia, 240km off the west coast of mainland Italy, is the second-largest island in the Mediterranean Sea. It is almost three times the size of French-owned Corsica, its immediate neighbor to the north, and only marginally smaller than Italy's other major island, Sicily. The island, known as Sardegna to its Italian-speaking inhabitants, has belonged to various empires and kingdoms over the centuries. This is reflected in its place names, architecture, languages and dialects, and its unique portfolio of wine grapes. Since the mid-18th Century, Sardinia has been one of Italy's five autonomous regions, but its separation from the mainland has led to a culture and identity somewhat removed from the Italian mainstream. This is reflected in the Sardinian relationship with wine. Wine is much less culturally and historically engrained there than in the mainland regions, and wine production and consumption on any scale has developed only in the past few centuries. The most "Italian" varieties here are Malvasia and Vermentino, but even Vermentino can only just be considered Italian, being more widely planted on Corsica and southern France – often under the name Rolle – than in its homeland, Liguria. Muscat Blanc (Moscato Bianco), ubiquitous all around the Mediterranean, further contributes to the pan-Mediterranean feel of Sardinian viniculture. Viticulture is a minority enterprise in Sardinia, despite generous financial incentives from the government. Only a small percentage of the island's land is given over to vines, and there seems to be little drive to capitalize on the island's naturally vine-friendly climate and landscape. Happily, a handful of producers are creating high-quality wines, which are gradually gaining international recognition. The majority of Sardinian vineyards lie on the western side of the island, which is also where its most location-specific DOCs are found. The exception to this westerly bias is Vermentino di Gallura, the island's only DOCG, whose catchment area covers the island's northeastern corner. However the most familiar appellations to many drinkers are likely to be the island-wide DOCs Cannonau di Sardegna and Vermentino di Sardegna. Sardinia's terroir is full of promise for further expansion. The combination of hills and plains, coastal regions and inland areas offers useful diversity of topography and mesoclimates. To further these benefits, the available soils and bedrocks vary from granite, limestone and sandstone to mineral-rich clays and free-draining sands and gravels. Located between 38 and 41 degrees north, the island lies at the southern edge of European viniculture, but thanks to the cooling effects of the Mediterranean, the maritime climate here is more forgiving than in other regions at this latitude.